Wednesday, May 28, 2014

6-year-old rescues 8-year-old friend drowning in Florida pool

6-year-old rescues 8-year-old friend drowning in Florida pool 

Six-year-old Romeo Rodriguez was swimming in a Palm Bay pool on Sunday when he noticed his 8-year-old friend wasn’t moving under water. He pulled her out, and a nurse at the weekend gathering started CPR. The girl is recovering, her family says.

 
NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
 
Tuesday, May 27, 2014, 7:11 AM


Romeo Rodriguez, 6, saved the life of 8-year-old friend after she sunk to the bottom of a swimming pool Sunday.




























Romeo Rodriguez, 6, saved the life of 8-year-old friend after she sunk to the bottom of a swimming pool Sunday.
A heroic boy saved his drowning 8-year-old friend from a Florida pool Sunday.
Six-year-old Romeo Rodriguez and his friend Cathy were swimming at a friend's Palm Bay house when Cathy sunk to the bottom of the pool, Orlando's WESH reported.
"She drowned and hit her head. I went to touch her to see if she was just playing, and she wasn't moving," Romeo told the TV station.
So the quick-thinking kid pulled her out.
One of the adults at the house — a nurse — started CPR.


'I went to touch her to see if she was just playing, and she wasn't moving,' the 6-year-old said.WESH'I went to touch her to see if she was just playing, and she wasn't moving,' the 6-year-old said.
When a police officer arrived, she was able to jump start Cathy's heart with a portable defibrillator. Paramedics got there a few minutes later and took Cathy to a local hospital.
The family says Cathy is doing well.
"There's certain highlight moments in your career, and this will be a definite highlight for everybody that was on that scene," Lt. Brian Gent of the Palm Bay Fire Department Rescue Squad told the TV station.


Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/national/boy-saves-friend-drowning-fla-pool-article-1.1806513#ixzz332AP8dl4

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Cupertino tot is latest Bay Area drowning victim

Updated 2:52 am, Tuesday, May 20, 2014

(05-19) 16:00 PDT CUPERTINO -- A 1-year-old Cupertino boy drowned in a spa, the latest in a spate of water-related deaths in the region as the weather warms, authorities said Monday.
Lukasz Zavislak, who was a month shy of turning 2, died at a hospital of freshwater drowning, according to the Santa Clara County medical examiner's office.
Sheriff's deputies responded to the boy's home on Anson Avenue about 4 p.m. Sunday. Firefighters were already performing CPR on the child, said Sgt. Kurtis Stenderup.
At least one of his parents was home at the time, Stenderup. Details of what led up to the drowning remained under investigation Monday.
In a separate tragedy, an 18-month-old boy who drowned in Antioch was identified Monday as Marceau Singh-Jackson.
Marceau was found in a swimming pool at a home on Zinfandel Court about 3:45 p.m. Friday. He died at a hospital.
There was a fence around the pool and adults were present, police said. The circumstances leading up to the drowning are under investigation.
That tragedy came five days after an infant nearly drowned in a residential pool on Ducker Court in Concord. The baby was taken to a hospital and was stabilized.
In another incident, 27-year-old Edward Pinelli of Concord apparently drowned in Lake Berryessa about 3:30 p.m. Sunday after failing to surface after jumping from a rock during a camping trip with friends, authorities said.
Henry K. Lee is a San Francisco Chronicle staff writer. E-mail: hlee@sfchronicle.comTwitter: @henryklee

Dad Throws Toddler in Pool as Punishment for Drowning Puppy

An Arizona dad faces felony charges after he reportedly left his 1-year-old daughter alone by a gate-less pool for 25 minutes, then threw her into the water to teach her a lesson when he discovered she had accidentally drowned a puppy.
Corey Edmund McCarthy, who is 23, wasn't very involved in his daughter Mia's life, according to family members. The toddler's mom, Samantha, has custody of their daughter but believed she was doing the right thing by letting Corey get to know her better. She was shocked and in tears when she actually watched her ex throw Mia four feet into the air and into a pool -- yep, the entire incident was caught on a surveillance camera.
Thanks to the video footage, cops were able to see that Corey had left Mia to wander around the pool by herself for an astoundingly long time, especially considering how it takes seconds for a child to fall and drown in a pool. While she was by herself, Mia threw two dogs into the pool and one apparently died.
Instead of blaming himself for being such a careless parent, Corey returned to the pool with his girlfriend. Then he decided to punish a baby who can't reason, understand logic, or -- hello-- SWIM by throwing her several feet into the air and letting her fend for herself in the water.
Thankfully, his girlfriend jumped into the pool to rescue Mia. Police say dad then dropped his daughter into the pool yet again because he wanted to teach her to be afraid of the water.
Well, congrats dad -- it worked. The toddler's mom says Mia won't go anywhere near a bath or water now and is having nightmares. Way to go.
Whether you live in Arizona or Wisconsin, you know drowning is one of the leading causes of death in children. A young child should NEVER be left unattended by a body of water -- I don't care if there's a nine-foot gate surrounding the pool. You never take that kind of a chance.
This story could have easily ended with Mia accidentally falling into the pool and drowning. Corey has been charged with two counts of child abuse. Instead of planning how to dodge those charges, he should be taking every second to thank his lucky stars that his little girl is still alive today.
What sort of punishment do you think this dad should receive?

Monday, May 19, 2014

Preschool teacher uses CPR training to save 2-year-old

May 17, 2014|By Larry Barszewski, Sun Sentinel
Jennifer Richardson, a West Boca preschool teacher, used her CPR training on Saturday to resuscitate a 2-year-old who had fallen into a pool at St. Andrews at Winston Park in Coconut Creek.
COCONUT CREEK — Another 2-year-old. Another pool. But on Saturday, a preschool teacher with CPR training made the difference.
A drowning at St. Andrews at Winston Park on Lyons Road was averted because Jennifer Richardson knew 
  • what to do and resuscitated the girl even before paramedics arrived.
The girl, whose name was not released, was taken to Northwest Regional Medical Center for precautionary measures, police spokeswoman Sgt. Kathryn Markland said.
The toddler is the same age as twins who drowned in a Deerfield Beach pool in April, the same age as another twin who drowned in Sunrise in March and whose twin was hospitalized for months after nearly drowning.
Three other children — a 3-year-old boy in Coral Springs and 6- and 10-year-old boys in Delray Beach— also drowned in April.
The St. Andrew's pool was crowded with children attending a birthday party and their hovering parents when the toddler, whose family wasn't part of the party, went underwater shortly after 1 p.m..
Richardson, who lives west of Boca Raton and teaches at Boca's Professional Learning Academy on Lyons Road, was near the steps of the pool with her own son when the girl's mother stepped away from the child to get sunscreen from a bag by a nearby chair.
Richardson, who was paying attention to her own son, didn't notice the girl in trouble until the mother's shout.
She helped pull the girl from the pool, but she said the toddler had already turned purple and was very stiff. Others immediately tried to help, sticking fingers down the girl's throat or attempting mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. That's when Richardson stepped in, knowing from her training that chest compressions were the first thing the child needed.
Norbert Witwicki, who like Richardson was attending the birthday party, quickly realized she needed his help.
"I was pushing people away from her. I was protecting her so that she could do what she's doing," Witwicki said.
Said Richardson: "I can't imagine if we weren't there, because they were all doing the wrong thing. Those seconds are life-changing."
Witwicki was scared for the toddler.
"That little baby, her neck got so stiff," Witwicki said. He wanted to turn her head to the side for when the water came out, but couldn't.
After three sets of compressions, the water came out and the child's color started coming back, Richardson said, but soon started turning purple again.
"We did more compressions," Richardson said. "She puked and puked and puked."
Richardson said it was the first time she had had to use her CPR training. An experience she had of her own son falling into a pool when she was momentarily distracted raced through her mind.
"He was just there for a second, in a blink of an eye," Richardson said. "You never know."
Erica Brown, who was at the party, knows Richardson saved the child's life.
"She's a godsend," Brown said. "Everybody has their children to tuck in tonight."
lbarszewski@tribune.com or 954-356-4556

Monday, May 12, 2014

Two toddlers die after drowning incident



On Friday, the two children were found floating face down in a swimming pool at a home on Morning Dove Circle.

18-month-old Silas Lugo-Walsh died at 11 p.m. on Saturday, May 10, while 2-year-old Jayvien Watkins passed away at 12:30 p.m. on May 11.
On Friday, the two children were found floating face down in a swimming pool at a home on Morning Dove Circle.
According to the sheriff's office, they were in the pool between 10 to 15 minutes before they were found by a parent who was inside the home.
Autopsies for both will be conducted and the investigation is ongoing.
10 News will continue to update this story.

2 kids fighting for life after near-drowning

Two children are in critical condition at St. Joseph's Hospital in Tampa after a near drowning at a home in Lakeland.
Lakeland, Florida – Two toddlers who nearly drowned in a backyard swimming pool are fighting for their lives.
Both toddlers remain in "very critical condition" at St. Joseph's Hospital, according to the Polk County Sheriff's Office.
The 911 call came in at 6:14 on Friday afternoon stating that the toddlers, a 12- and 24-month-old, were floating face down in a swimming pool at a home on Morning Dove Circle in Lakeland.
According to the sheriff's office, they were in the pool between 10 to 15 minutes before they were found by a parent who was inside the home.
Polk County deputies who first responded to the scene performed CPR on the children before EMS arrived and transported them to Lakeland Regional Medical Center.
After their arrival, both were airlifted to St. Joseph's Hospital in Tampa where they are listed in critical condition.
At the scene, Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd called the incident a "nightmare" situation on Mother's Day weekend and a "tragic accident."
The toddlers have been identified as Jayvian Trevis Watkins, 2, and Silas Lugo Walsh, 18 months. Parents Jonathan Walsh and Serena Lugo were inside the home when the incident happened.
Investigators say that there was a closed door leading to the pool area that was not locked and the pool fence was not secure, allowing the children access to the water.

5-year-old drowns in pool in Riverview, Florida

It happened at an apartment complex on Azalea Bloom Way.
Riverview, Florida -- A Riverview 5-year-old drowned in a pool on Mother's Day. It happened at an apartment complex on Azalea Bloom Way. Some witnesses saw the little boy's body being pulled from the pool and they saw people and then EMTs trying to revive him.
"I saw a lot of people screaming, saw sheriff, saw the little kid. Did not look good," said resident Joseph Gunnoe.
"Nine or ten paramedics ran past me, ran down," said resident Tony Prevette.
It was a quiet scene Sunday night, but witnesses say it was chaotic as people tried to save the child.
"It's not necessary, uncalled for. You gotta watch kids. I am a father-to-be and you have to watch your children," said Gunnoe.
Sheriff's deputies say the child's parents and other family members were home when the accident happened, but the mother looked away and then couldn't find him.
"It sucks, especially on Mother's Day," said Prevette.
Witnesses say the child was in the pool playing with his football, then something happened.
Deputies continued interviewing witnesses for hours trying to figure out what happened.
Witnesses say this is a tragic and unnecessary accident.

Monday, May 5, 2014

No pool fence in Lauderhill near-drowning of child, police say


The incident happened early Sunday evening when the child was left unattended for just minutes, police said.
A 1-year-old child was reported hospitalized and breathing on her own Monday, just hours after slipping away from her mother and being found floating in the family's swimming pool, police said.
The girl, who police did not identify, remained in the intensive care unit at Plantation General Hospital, Lt. Gregory Solowsky said. "It's looking positive," said Solowsky.

The mother pulled the girl from the pool and began CPR, Solowsky said. Police and paramedics took over resuscitation efforts when they arrived, police said.
The child's mother called 911 at 5:30 p.m. Sunday to report that she found the girl in the pool at a home in the 7300 block of Northwest 35th Court. The child had disappeared from the mother's sight for two to five minutes, Solowsky said.
The near-drowning continues a series of swimming pool accidents that have claimed the lives of at least six children in Broward and Palm Beach counties in the last two months.
Three-year-old Brandon Paul St. Onge fell into his family's Coral Springs swimming pool and drowned Wednesday after he slipped away from his parents to ride his tricycle.

Last month two boys in Delray Beach, ages 6 and 10, died in a pool.
Two-year-old twins drowned in a Deerfield Beach pool in early April. And in Sunrise in early March, twin toddlers, also 2, were taken to a hospital after they were pulled from a pool. One child died five days later, and the other has remained hospitalized.
"It is imperative that if a child has access to a pool, that pool have a fence around it," said Solowsky. "There was no fence in this case."
Parents should also enroll young children in water safety courses, Solowsky said.